The Garden As Healer


The concept of paradise is derived from the Persian term for a garden and has consistently been understood to signify the same thing across all cultures. It exemplifies what it would be like to have paradise here on earth. And is this not our chance to have a small piece of paradise right now and right now? When we realise that gardens provide us a place of refuge and well-being, it has a restorative importance as a healer, and this understanding gives it a restorative significance as a healer. According to the World Health Organization, stress is the health pandemic of the 21st century. The garden has the ability to offer a place of sanctuary from this growing public health concern.

It is believed by many medical professionals that stress, which may lead to sickness, is the primary causal reason behind 70 percent of all visits to the family doctor. The capacity of the garden to serve as a location where people might be healed and find calm is becoming more important as an increasing number of people are afflicted by the disease that is modern day living.

It is not important whether an indoor garden consists of a few pots on a windowsill or a lush garden room; what is important is that plants add a dimension to the home or workplace that literally changes the energy and adds life.?t matters little whether an indoor garden consists of a few pots on a windowsill or a lush garden room. There is something about taking care of plants and tending to them, whether by watering, re-potting, or touching the leaves, that re-connects us on a fundamental level with an overwhelming sense of wonder regarding this miracle of life, of which we are an integral part. This sense of wonder is reawakened when we touch the leaves of a plant.

Time seems to stand still for us as we see the recurrent patterns at work in the gardens that we tend, and we revel in the realisation that we are intimately connected to both the physical and the metaphysical aspects of our own being. Starting seeds indoors provides a head start on spring for those of us who get twitchy fingers in January and allows us to grow different types of plants that are not usually available from greenhouses. Growing herbs indoors facilitates our ability to cook with fresh herbs throughout the year. Corners in rooms and on furniture are softened when plants are introduced and placed in these areas. Living plants create feelings of calm and well-being. Reasons for creating an indoor garden include:

Creating an Indoor Garden: Step-by-Step Instructions 1. What is the Purpose? What is it that you hope to accomplish? mending, meditation, the cultivation of culinary herbs, or even working on a project with the kids? 2.

Space? How much room is there to make use of? a storage area, a chamber in the basement, the living room, a section of the bedroom, or a windowsill? 3. Seating? Is there room for a sitting area in the space you have available? 4. What are the characteristics? Build a garden specialising on a certain kind of plant, such as a collection of ficus trees, orchids, herbs, or ferns. 5. Elements may include of art, artefacts with emotional value, wind chimes, scent and/or colour therapy, candles, and/or music. Water features, such as fountains, may also be included.

  1. Where are you? Is there space available for indoor gardening at this location? 7. Light? Is there enough natural light, or will you also need to rely on artificial lighting? 8. Plants? Which plants do you intend to grow?

Tabletop gardens, herb gardens, healing gardens, meditation gardens, container gardens, water gardens, wildlife gardens, and even wildlife gardens may all be included in the category of indoor gardens.

Thomas Moore wrote the following:

? you may need to relearn the secret of the garden, which consists of how the garden’s outward features serve as a model for the heart itself, and how the soul is a garden contained inside itself, serving as our own personal paradise where we may be revitalised and rejuvenated. To put it another way, the interior garden may serve as a place of refuge where we are able to pause for a while and get in touch with the holiness that is inside us. Gwen Nyhus Stewart, B. S.

W., M. G., and H. T. are the authors of the book “The Healing Garden: A Place of Peace.” W. is an educator, while M. G. and H. T. are both freelance writers and garden consultants. The gardening books “Gardening For The Soil” and “Gardening For The Soul” as well as the gardening booklet “Non-toxic Alternatives for Everyday Cleaning and Gardening Products” are two resources that may be used. She is the proprietor of the website Gwen’s Healing Garden, on which you can get a great deal of free information on gardening for the earth as well as gardening for the soul.

Recent Posts

error: Content is protected !!